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Hemispheric cooperation for competitive, secure, sustainable and inclusive ports in the Americas.

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Inter-American Committee on Ports (CIP)

The Inter-American Committee on Ports (CIP) is the only permanent forum that brings together the National Port Authorities of the 34 Member Countries of the Organization of American States (OAS) and leaders of the maritime-port industry.

The CIP promotes:

  • The development of a competitive, secure, sustainable and inclusive port sector;
  • Policy dialogue;
  • Strengthening of institutional capacities *;
  • Technical assistance; and,
  • Cooperation with private sector.

* Through its Scholarship and Training Program, which includes certified courses, seminars, workshops and hemispheric conferences. These activities are carried out in collaboration with CIP Members, Associate Members and Strategic Partners.

The CIP and its Secretariat work on these areas according to the Plan of Action of Montevideo 2016-2018 (CIDI/CIP/doc. 6/16 rev.3).

The CIP is key to any country as ports are a vital link in the global supply chain, so the relevance of having a competitive, secure, efficient and sustainable port sector is clear.” CIP Executive Board (CECIP) [1]

The CIP held its 11th Regular Meeting in Mexico in 2018 where the 2018-2020 Plan of Action and the Resolution of Mexico were approved and the current Board was elected.

The CIP constantly monitors the gaps in a continuously changing maritime and port sector, in order to bring concrete results to regional matters and challenges. The following four (4) examples show different common gaps covered and their results:

Priority PillarGap CoveredResults
1. Port Protection and SecurityNon-existence of cyber security to protect all big data in the maritime sector leaving the port information vulnerable, as well as a lack of direct communication between countriesPort Cyber Risk Management Survey (implemented jointly with CICTE). Divided in two phases: a) State Capabilities in Maritime and Port Security; and b) Cyber Security Survey

Caribbean Cooperation Framework, aiming to bring concrete benefits in the areas of port and maritime security to Member States of the CIP, by establishing a reliable and safe system of direct communication and by offering internationally recognized training programs.

Improved Disaster Risk Management for Ports in the Caribbean. To contribute to reduce the impact of natural and manmade disasters on business continuity by strengthening disaster risk management capabilities in Port and Maritime Authorities of the Caribbean.
2. Logistics, Innovation and CompetitivenessAbsence of a tool to systematize the process of measuring, monitoring and controlling efficiency to improve competitivenessOxford Economics – CIP – IRU Report on Economic Competitiveness. Development of common indicators to support homogeneous metrics and planning for ports
3. Sustainable Port Management and Environmental ProtectionDeficiency in sustainable port operations and marine environmental protectionStudy on Energy Efficiency in Container Terminals

Green House Gas (GHG) Emission Reduction Port Incentive Program
4. Public Policy, Legislation and RegulationLack of established basic laws required to ensure legal safeguards and private investmentGuide to Model Port Legislation that identifies and describes 30 elements that port legislation should contain

Note on Model Port Law Guide

Technical Assistance to SVG, Mexico and Dominican Republic in modernizing Port Legislation

[1] Guillermo Ruiz de Teresa, Coordinator General of Ports and Merchant Marine for Mexico, SCT and Chair of the CECIP 2016-2018.